Where did the time go? Isn’t that the question often asked, as there never seems to be enough of it. But how is it that super successful people, like Richard Branson and Oprah Winfrey, have that same 24 hours, yet accomplish so much more?

Time and money seem to be the two biggest challenges people face – we’ll tackle time for now and come back to money on another occasion.

I’ve broken down four major areas to focus on, in being an effective time manager.

1. Personal Productivity
2. Delegating Tasks
3. Managing Results
4. Leverage

Managing your time is easy, very easy. What gets in the way of people being effective time managers is their lack of vision and power and choice over their thoughts about what has to be done. In the absence of these, the “to do” of time management becomes a great challenge. So, know your vision and do the work on your internal thoughts.

1. Personal Productivity

Start with what needs to be done. Ask yourself, “Am I the only one that can do this?” Most often, people are single focused, thinking they are the only one that can do something, which causes overwhelm.

Honesty is key. If only you can perform a task, make it a priority and don’t waste time. Do it immediately.

Use a calendar. Putting things on a calendar ensures it gets done. It’s hard to complete a task that’s not in a system for remembering to do it.

Focus on one task at a time with all of your attention on that task. Focused attention is more effective, while multi-tasking only delays the process of completion.

2. Delegating Tasks

Remember the old saying “first things first”. Determine the things that need to be attended to first and keep in mind the things only you can do.  With what’s left, delegate to someone who is effective, competent and has the ability to produce.

Oftentimes, we delegate to those who don’t have skill, the time or are ineffective. Be sure you’re soliciting the right person for the task.

3. Managing Results

If you do this effectively you’ll delegate, manage and focus only on the results that are being produced or not produced.

Keep in mind:

  1. You must identify milestones and timelines.
  2. You need to be in regular communication with the person(s) you’ve delegated the task.
  3. You need to track their progress and evaluate their results.


4. Leverage

Leverage is a combination of personal productivity, delegating tasks, managing results and optimizing other people’s time, efforts, and resources. Leveraging heightens your ability to see “how” to get things done. You strategically look to see how to best utilize the resources you have.

As with Richard Branson, when he shares his vision with his management team, he in essence shares with his entire team. It funnels all the way down to the flight attendants in his airlines. He leverages his resources to get more done. So can you.

As with Richard Branson, when he shares his vision with his management team, he in essence shares with his entire team. It funnels all the way down to the flight attendants in his airlines. He leverages his resources to get more done. So can you.

We all have the same 24 hours, how are you using yours?

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Lisa Thomas is the CEO of The P3 Group, Inc. and The P3 Group International, LLC, publisher of The P3 Power Boost Online Magazine, host of The P3 Power Boost Radio Show, and President of the Board of Directors of NetWorth. She is a 20-year veteran in business, executive leadership and performance coaching/consulting. She has worked extensive with corporate call centers, executives and small business enterprises. She’s been a featured columnist and business strategist on Affiliate NPR, WFDD, The Cary News, Fox 8 and numerous NBC affiliate stations.

Lisa is best known for her business and leadership acumen and is widely recognized her ability to develop leaders to be more effective. Lisa is also a sought after keynote speaker on various topics women in leadership face. She generously donates her time and expertise to a number of organizations and worthy causes, including NetWorth, the Business Succession Forum Network, and the Hazel B. Neal Foundation, for which she recently was recognized with the woman of Power, Purpose and Vision award. In her downtime, she can be found practicing yoga, cycling, swimming, reading a good book or spending time with family and friends.

Lisa Thomas
CEO/Sr. Business Strategist
The P3 Group, Inc.

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